Microsoft Visual Studio .NET Enterprise Developer

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Deployment Tips (10)

Most Common Setup Type
Not Determined
Average Package Difficulty Rating
Rated 2 / 5 (Somewhat Easy) based on 3 ratings
Most Commonly Reported Deployment Method
Repackaged (to a setup.msi)
or cancel
118
Note
MAKING WCU AND VISUAL STUDIO .NET ACTIVE DIRECTORY DISTRIBUTION FRIENDLY
The information provided in the solution is provided as a general method for configuring the Windows Component Update and Visual Studio .NET to be installed using conventional Windows Installer methods or Active Directory. Different installation scenarios (such as installing a non professional Visual Studio .NET version) may require modifications to this process. This process has only been tested with a select licensed version of Visual Studio .NET Professional. This article assumes the reader has an advanced understanding of Windows Installer. It also assumes that the contents of the Visual Studio .NET CD’s have been copied to distribution location. Also, please forgive me for any grammatical or spelling error because, Dam it Jim, I’m an engineer, not an English teacher.

WCU
The WCU consists of several small applications that are installed via a central setup.exe. I believe that this was done mainly because the MSI version used for VS is 2.0, and the one currently (at the time) used was 1.1. So the setup.exe could launch the setup program to update the windows installer system without using MSI. Now, once Windows 2000 SP3 came out, our MSI problems were solved because it update the windows installer to 2.0. Consequently, Windows XP SP1 also includes MSI version 2.0. SP3 can be applied via policy, or integrated into the Windows 2000 deployment source. Before SP3, we played with installing the pre-sp3 MSI 2.0. This version had some bugs that made installing some other MSI packages impossible, so we abandoned the idea.

Most of the components in the WCU can be installed using windows installer. Some only come in .exe form. But there are solutions to these problems.

This is a list of what software I installed in order.

1. Windows2000 SP3 integrated or patched (could also be XP SP1 integrated or patched)
2. Visual Studio .NET Baseline – English (wcu\bootstrap.msi)
3. Microsoft FrontPage Client – English (wcu\weccom.msi)
4. Microsoft .NET Framework Setup Registry (Custom msi file wcu\dotnetframework\netfxreg.msi)
5. Microsoft .NET Framework (English) (netfx.msi)
6. MDAC 2.7 (Custom msi file wcu\mdac27\mdac27.msi)

Some of these are easy to set up, some are a little more involved and require knowledge of MSI structure and an MSI editor such as Orca, Wise for windows installer, or WinInstall.

For starters, the client workstation will have to have 2000 with SP3 or XP with SP1 installed. We accomplish this by integrating the SP into the distribution source before installing the OS.

The bootstrap.msi and wecom.msi file come with the WCU and can be installed using a GPO (Group Policy Object).

The netfxreg.msi is a custom msi file that sets up some registry info required to allow VS to install without telling it to not check for the framework setup. Also, netfx.msi will need it. To create this, crate a new MSI file using an msi editor like Wise for windows installer or winINSTALL LE (This comes on the Windows 2000 Server CD in the valueadd\3rdparty\mgmt\winstle folder). Add the following registry entries to the msi:

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\Full]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\Full\v1.0.3705]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\Full\v1.0.3705\1033]
"ProductCode"="{B43357AA-3A6D-4D94-B56E-43C44D09E548}"
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\Full\v1.0.3705\1033\Microsoft .NET Framework Full v1.0.3705 (1033)]
"Install"=dword:00000001
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\Product]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\Product\Microsoft .NET Framework Full v1.0.3705 (1033)]
"Package"="Full"
"Version"="v1.0.3705"
"ProductLanguage"="1033"

The above text is from a standard regedit 5.0 file and can be imported into most msi editors.

Save this file into the wcu\dotnetframework folder as netfxreg.msi and add it to your GPO.

The netfx.msi file is actually contained inside the dotnetfx.exe package located in wcu\dotnetframework. To get this file, simply uncompress the donetfx.exe package into the dotnetframework folder. This will also uncompress some files used by netfx.msi (as well as some file that are used to launch netfx.msi when the package is used as it was intended to be used). The important files are netfx.msi and netfx1.cab. Add the netfx.msi to your GPO.

The most difficult package to this process is the MDAC27.msi. This MdacInstall.exe contains a paper that tells you all about creating this package. Download it form http://download.microsoft.com/download/MDAC26/module/1/WIN98XP/EN-US/MdacInstall.exe

Save this package to the wcu\MDAC27 folder as MDAC27.msi and add it to your GPO.

Once you apply this GPO to your workstation, The Windows Component Update will be applied to your workstations(s).

Visual Studio
This part took a lot more research, but one I figured it out, it became extremely simple. I still can’t figure out why Microsoft will publish a way to do this with SMS but won’t tell you how to make this simple (but long) transform file.

The secret is in the log file produced during setup. It is located in the temp folder of the user used to install VS. Look for the installlog.txt file in the temp folder after you have manually setup VS7 on a workstation. Open the file in notepad and make sure word wrap is off. Scroll to the right about a page with, and the scroll down until your find an extremely long line. This line will be labeled as “MsiInstallProduct initiated with command line”. This line shows you the properties that the setup.exe passed to the vs_setup.msi. I had previously tried to find this using process explorer, but found that the setup.exe and vs_setup.msi communicate via com. So what does this “command line” contain? Well, it contains all the stuff you need to install VS using the vs_setup.msi (assuming that the computer it is being installed on has a properly installed Windows Component Update). This list shows the properties typically set in the command line:

SUITEINTEGRATIONKEY="YOUR-SUITE-INTERGRATION-KEY"
VSEXTUI="1"
SETUPWINDOW="65842"
REINSTALLMODE="omus"
INSTALLLEVEL="2"
USERNAME="Your Name"
REBOOT="Suppress"
PIDKEY="YOUR PRODUCT ID KEY"
COMPANYNAME="Your Company Name”
ALLUSERS="1"
ADDLOCAL="Visual_Studio.NET_Professional, Tools_for_Redistributing_Apps, Visual_Studio_Graphics_Library, Redistributable_Merge_Modules, MSDN_Documentation, zMSDN_Documentation, Platform_SDK_Docs_for_VS7, _Visual_Studio_.NET_Documentation, Crystal_Reports, VCS_Crystal_Report_Project_Items_, VB7_Crystal_Report_Project_Items, VC_Crystal_Report_Project_Item, Crystal_Report_Share, MSDE_Setup_Files, dotNET_Framework_SDK, SDK_Samples_for_VS, Server_Components_for_Pro_Edition, VS_Remote_Debugger, Full_Remote_Debugging, Visual_Database_Tools_Sproc_Version, Language_Tools_for_VS_7_Pro, VB_for_VS7_Pro, VCpp_for_VS_7_Pro, VCpp_Runtime_Libraries, CRT2_Static_Libraries, CRT3_Shared_Libraries, CRT4_Source_Code, CRT1_Single_Threaded_Libraries, VCpp_Class_and_Template_Libraries, ATL_MFC_Static_Libraries_ANSI, ATL_MFC_Shared_Libraries_ANSI, ATL_MFC_Static_Libraries_Unicode, ATL_MFC_Shared_Libraries_Unicode, ATL_MFC_Source_Code,VCpp_Tools, Trace_Utility, Spy_Plus_Plus, OLE_Com_Object_Viewer, ActiveX_Control_Test_Container, Error_Lookup, WebDbg, VCsh_for_VS_7_Pro"

ADDSOURCE="Visual_Studio_.NET_Samples"
ARPINSTALLLOCATION="C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio .NET\"

Most of the above properties are self explanatory. The interesting one is ADDLOCAL. It is a list of all the components that were checked in the add/remove components section of setup. Now we can take all this info and create a transform file to be used to install VS. If you are unfamiliar with creating a transform, you can follow these steps to create it. These steps will require the Orca.exe and the MsiTran.exe found in the Windows Installer SDK. Note that Ocrca.exe is installed by the Orca.msi installer package.

1. Copy the vs_setup.msi into the same folder that it currently resides and rename the copy to vs_setup1.msi
2. Open the vs_setup1.msi file with Orca
3. Select the Properties table in the left hand column
4. Add or modify each of the properties from the above list into the right column. You may want to keep the ALLUSERS property set to 2. This will place the shortcuts for the software in the All Users Documents and Settings area. Also, you will probably want to copy and past the ADDLOCAL property value.
5. Once you’re done adding / modifying the properties, save the file and exit Orca
6. Open a command window and make your current directory the directory the location where you have placed the msi files.
7. Run the command [path to installer SDK tools]msitran.exe –g vs_setup.msi vs_setup1.msi vs_setup.mst
8. You should have a transform that can be applies to the vs_setup.msi using the msiexec.exe or used in a GPO to apply VS via Active Directory.
Setup Information:
Setup Type: unspecified
Deployment Method Used: unspecified
Deployment Difficulty: unspecified
Platform(s): Windows
Please log in to comment
118
Note
MAKING WCU AND VISUAL STUDIO .NET ACTIVE DIRECTORY DISTRIBUTION FRIENDLY
The information provided in the solution is provided as a general method for configuring the Windows Component Update and Visual Studio .NET to be installed using conventional Windows Installer methods or Active Directory. Different installation scenarios (such as installing a non professional Visual Studio .NET version) may require modifications to this process. This process has only been tested with a select licensed version of Visual Studio .NET Professional. This article assumes the reader has an advanced understanding of Windows Installer. It also assumes that the contents of the Visual Studio .NET CDÂ’s have been copied to distribution location. Also, please forgive me for any grammatical or spelling error because, Dam it Jim, IÂ’m an engineer, not an English teacher.

WCU
The WCU consists of several small applications that are installed via a central setup.exe. I believe that this was done mainly because the MSI version used for VS is 2.0, and the one currently (at the time) used was 1.1. So the setup.exe could launch the setup program to update the windows installer system without using MSI. Now, once Windows 2000 SP3 came out, our MSI problems were solved because it update the windows installer to 2.0. Consequently, Windows XP SP1 also includes MSI version 2.0. SP3 can be applied via policy, or integrated into the Windows 2000 deployment source. Before SP3, we played with installing the pre-sp3 MSI 2.0. This version had some bugs that made installing some other MSI packages impossible, so we abandoned the idea.

Most of the components in the WCU can be installed using windows installer. Some only come in .exe form. But there are solutions to these problems.

This is a list of what software I installed in order.

1. Windows2000 SP3 integrated or patched (could also be XP SP1 integrated or patched)
2. Visual Studio .NET Baseline – English (wcu\bootstrap.msi)
3. Microsoft FrontPage Client – English (wcu\weccom.msi)
4. Microsoft .NET Framework Setup Registry (Custom msi file wcu\dotnetframework\netfxreg.msi)
5. Microsoft .NET Framework (English) (netfx.msi)
6. MDAC 2.7 (Custom msi file wcu\mdac27\mdac27.msi)

Some of these are easy to set up, some are a little more involved and require knowledge of MSI structure and an MSI editor such as Orca, Wise for windows installer, or WinInstall.

For starters, the client workstation will have to have 2000 with SP3 or XP with SP1 installed. We accomplish this by integrating the SP into the distribution source before installing the OS.

The bootstrap.msi and wecom.msi file come with the WCU and can be installed using a GPO (Group Policy Object).

The netfxreg.msi is a custom msi file that sets up some registry info required to allow VS to install without telling it to not check for the framework setup. Also, netfx.msi will need it. To create this, crate a new MSI file using an msi editor like Wise for windows installer or winINSTALL LE (This comes on the Windows 2000 Server CD in the valueadd\3rdparty\mgmt\winstle folder). Add the following registry entries to the msi:

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\Full]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\Full\v1.0.3705]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\Full\v1.0.3705\1033]
"ProductCode"="{B43357AA-3A6D-4D94-B56E-43C44D09E548}"
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\Full\v1.0.3705\1033\Microsoft .NET Framework Full v1.0.3705 (1033)]
"Install"=dword:00000001
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\Product]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\Product\Microsoft .NET Framework Full v1.0.3705 (1033)]
"Package"="Full"
"Version"="v1.0.3705"
"ProductLanguage"="1033"

The above text is from a standard regedit 5.0 file and can be imported into most msi editors.

Save this file into the wcu\dotnetframework folder as netfxreg.msi and add it to your GPO.

The netfx.msi file is actually contained inside the dotnetfx.exe package located in wcu\dotnetframework. To get this file, simply uncompress the donetfx.exe package into the dotnetframework folder. This will also uncompress some files used by netfx.msi (as well as some file that are used to launch netfx.msi when the package is used as it was intended to be used). The important files are netfx.msi and netfx1.cab. Add the netfx.msi to your GPO.

The most difficult package to this process is the MDAC27.msi. This MdacInstall.exe contains a paper that tells you all about creating this package. Download it form http://download.microsoft.com/download/MDAC26/module/1/WIN98XP/EN-US/MdacInstall.exe

Save this package to the wcu\MDAC27 folder as MDAC27.msi and add it to your GPO.

Once you apply this GPO to your workstation, The Windows Component Update will be applied to your workstations(s).

Visual Studio
This part took a lot more research, but one I figured it out, it became extremely simple. I still canÂ’t figure out why Microsoft will publish a way to do this with SMS but wonÂ’t tell you how to make this simple (but long) transform file.

The secret is in the log file produced during setup. It is located in the temp folder of the user used to install VS. Look for the installlog.txt file in the temp folder after you have manually setup VS7 on a workstation. Open the file in notepad and make sure word wrap is off. Scroll to the right about a page with, and the scroll down until your find an extremely long line. This line will be labeled as “MsiInstallProduct initiated with command line”. This line shows you the properties that the setup.exe passed to the vs_setup.msi. I had previously tried to find this using process explorer, but found that the setup.exe and vs_setup.msi communicate via com. So what does this “command line” contain? Well, it contains all the stuff you need to install VS using the vs_setup.msi (assuming that the computer it is being installed on has a properly installed Windows Component Update). This list shows the properties typically set in the command line:

SUITEINTEGRATIONKEY="YOUR-SUITE-INTERGRATION-KEY"
VSEXTUI="1"
SETUPWINDOW="65842"
REINSTALLMODE="omus"
INSTALLLEVEL="2"
USERNAME="Your Name"
REBOOT="Suppress"
PIDKEY="YOUR PRODUCT ID KEY"
COMPANYNAME="Your Company Name”
ALLUSERS="1"
ADDLOCAL="Visual_Studio.NET_Professional, Tools_for_Redistributing_Apps, Visual_Studio_Graphics_Library, Redistributable_Merge_Modules, MSDN_Documentation, zMSDN_Documentation, Platform_SDK_Docs_for_VS7, _Visual_Studio_.NET_Documentation, Crystal_Reports, VCS_Crystal_Report_Project_Items_, VB7_Crystal_Report_Project_Items, VC_Crystal_Report_Project_Item, Crystal_Report_Share, MSDE_Setup_Files, dotNET_Framework_SDK, SDK_Samples_for_VS, Server_Components_for_Pro_Edition, VS_Remote_Debugger, Full_Remote_Debugging, Visual_Database_Tools_Sproc_Version, Language_Tools_for_VS_7_Pro, VB_for_VS7_Pro, VCpp_for_VS_7_Pro, VCpp_Runtime_Libraries, CRT2_Static_Libraries, CRT3_Shared_Libraries, CRT4_Source_Code, CRT1_Single_Threaded_Libraries, VCpp_Class_and_Template_Libraries, ATL_MFC_Static_Libraries_ANSI, ATL_MFC_Shared_Libraries_ANSI, ATL_MFC_Static_Libraries_Unicode, ATL_MFC_Shared_Libraries_Unicode, ATL_MFC_Source_Code,VCpp_Tools, Trace_Utility, Spy_Plus_Plus, OLE_Com_Object_Viewer, ActiveX_Control_Test_Container, Error_Lookup, WebDbg, VCsh_for_VS_7_Pro"

ADDSOURCE="Visual_Studio_.NET_Samples"
ARPINSTALLLOCATION="C:\Program Files\Microsoft Visual Studio .NET\"

Most of the above properties are self explanatory. The interesting one is ADDLOCAL. It is a list of all the components that were checked in the add/remove components section of setup. Now we can take all this info and create a transform file to be used to install VS. If you are unfamiliar with creating a transform, you can follow these steps to create it. These steps will require the Orca.exe and the MsiTran.exe found in the Windows Installer SDK. Note that Ocrca.exe is installed by the Orca.msi installer package.

1. Copy the vs_setup.msi into the same folder that it currently resides and rename the copy to vs_setup1.msi
2. Open the vs_setup1.msi file with Orca
3. Select the Properties table in the left hand column
4. Add or modify each of the properties from the above list into the right column. You may want to keep the ALLUSERS property set to 2. This will place the shortcuts for the software in the All Users Documents and Settings area. Also, you will probably want to copy and past the ADDLOCAL property value.
5. Once youÂ’re done adding / modifying the properties, save the file and exit Orca
6. Open a command window and make your current directory the directory the location where you have placed the msi files.
7. Run the command [path to installer SDK tools]msitran.exe –g vs_setup.msi vs_setup1.msi vs_setup.mst
8. You should have a transform that can be applies to the vs_setup.msi using the msiexec.exe or used in a GPO to apply VS via Active Directory.
Setup Information:
Setup Type: unspecified
Deployment Method Used: unspecified
Deployment Difficulty: unspecified
Platform(s): Windows
Please log in to comment
117
Note
I have tried to deploy VS.Net using some of the information above, and discovered 2 minor tricks in the process:

1: It is possible to install MSDN, without a transform. MSDN.MSI SETUP_EXE=yes /QB works as well.

2: It´s possible to initiate a silent install of VS_net.MSI by removing two custom actions, both named CA_LaunchCondition_6.3643236F_FC70_11D3_A536_0090278A1BB8
Setup Information:
Setup Type: unspecified
Deployment Method Used: unspecified
Deployment Difficulty: unspecified
Platform(s): Windows
Please log in to comment
117
Note
Run the following command at a command prompt to create the unattend file for the Visual Studio .NET installation

c:\ vs7\vs\setup\setup.exe /createunattend c:\vs.ini /no_bsln_check

For more information about how to run setup with the /createunattend switch, refer to the Adminreadme.htm file that is located in the Setup folder.

Share the Vs.ini file. You need to point to this file when you run setup on the client computers. In this example, the file is shared at \\SMSServer\Ini\Vs.ini.

Download the SMSWrapperPackage.exe file, and then save SMSWrapperPackage.exe to the same location that you copied the Visual Studio CDs to (for example, C:\VS7\VS in the preceding steps).

Source: KB Article Q309657
Setup Information:
Setup Type: unspecified
Deployment Method Used: unspecified
Deployment Difficulty: unspecified
Platform(s): Windows
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117
Note
Making Visual Studio .NET 2003 Active Directory Distribution Friendly

These notes are in addition to 'cwowings' notes above. Tested under Windows XP only. There are a few changes for the new version of Visual Studio .NET and also an easier way of creating the transforms.

First, follow the instructions '4.1 Facilitating setup on the network' in the Readme file. Make sure that the paths that you use does NOT contain spaces as this will break the installation.

Add each of these items to the Group Policy object in the following order.

* Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1 (Installed in Standard Software)
Extract netfx.msi from the dotnetfx.exe (in PRE\dotNetFramework)
There is no need to create netfxreg.msi under VS.NET 2003

* Visual Studio.NET Baseline
bootstrap.msi from PRE folder

* Microsoft FrontPage Client
weccom.msi from PRE folder

* Microsoft Visual J# .NET Redistributable Package 1.1 (Now required under VS.NET 2003)
Extract jsredist.msi from vjredist.exe (in PRE\JSharpRedistCore)

* Visual Studio .NET Professional 2003 - English
vs_setup.msi from VS folder
This requires a custom transform file:

To create this file, set up Visual Studio manually on a workstation, then look for a file named 'installlog.txt' in your temp directory.
Open up this file and look for a long line labelled as 'MsiInstallProduct initiated with command line'

Open up vs_setup.msi using Orca
Select Transform / New Transform from the menus
Then add the properties that you found in installlog.txt to the Property table. See cwowings notes (above) if you are unsure what this means.
Then go to Transform / Generate Transform and save the transform. You can now apply the transform to vs_setup.msi in Group Policy.

* MSDN Library for Visual Studio .NET 2003
msdn.msi from MSDN folder

This MSI is supposed to be run from setup.exe. However all that setup.exe seems to do is make sure you're running Internet Explorer 5.5 or later. Make sure if you're running under Windows 2000 that your upgrade to at least IE 5.5 before using this policy (there is a MSI wrapper available on appdeploy.com)

We need to create a transform that tricks the MSI into thinking that it is being run from setup.exe. It's quite easy.

Open up msdn.msi using Orca
Select Transform / New Transform
Add a new entry to the Property table with the name 'SETUP_EXE' and the value 'yes' (without the quotes).
Select Transform / Generate Transform

Apply this transform to the MSI file in Group Policy and it'll install perfectly (by default it does a Minimal install).

If you need a Full install, create another Transform using the same method as above except add a row to the Properties table with the name 'ADDLOCAL' and the value 'MSDN_Visual_Studio_Library, zMSDN_Documentation, Office_Developer_Documentation, Embedded_Development_Documentation, Knowledge_Base_Documentation, Enterprise_Development_, Windows_Development_Documentation, XML_and_Web_Services, zMSDN_Documentation_2, Visual_Studio_Eve_Documentation, Platform_SDK, _Office_2000_Documentation, Office_XP_Documentation, Microsoft_Access, FrontPage, MapPoint, Project_2000, Visio, SharePoint_Team_Services, Windows_CE, SQL_Server_2000_Windows_CE_Edition, Windows_CE_Application_Frameworks, Microsoft_Server_Appliance_Kit_, Windows_NT_Embedded, Windows_XP_Embedded, Windows_CE_.NET, Microsoft_Content_Management_Server, Exchange_Server_Documentation, Windows_2000_Documentation, Driver_Development_Kit, Windows_98_and_Windows_ME_Docs, Windows_NT_Documentation, Tablet_PC'

Hope this helps!
Setup Information:
Setup Type: unspecified
Deployment Method Used: unspecified
Deployment Difficulty: unspecified
Platform(s): Windows
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117
Note
Please note that there is a white paper published that describes how to configure Group Policy objects and deploy Visual Studio .NET 2003 using Active Directory. You can find this information here.

Hope this helps....
Setup Information:
Setup Type: unspecified
Deployment Method Used: unspecified
Deployment Difficulty: unspecified
Platform(s): Windows
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117
Note

When using SMS to install VS 7, take care on how you share the vs.ini file out. If you do not give the correct permissions the installer will fail with an incorrect .ini message. Otherwise you could use an SMS Software install account which you can explicitly give permissions to the vs.ini share which will work fine.

Setup Information:
Setup Type: unspecified
Deployment Method Used: unspecified
Deployment Difficulty: unspecified
Platform(s): Windows
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117
Note
I have tried to deploy VS.Net using some of the information above, and discovered 2 minor tricks in the process:

1: It is possible to install MSDN, without a transform. MSDN.MSI SETUP_EXE=yes /QB works as well.

2: It´s possible to initiate a silent install of VS_net.MSI by removing two custom actions, both named CA_LaunchCondition_6.3643236F_FC70_11D3_A536_0090278A1BB8
Setup Information:
Setup Type: unspecified
Deployment Method Used: unspecified
Deployment Difficulty: unspecified
Platform(s): Windows
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117
Note

Addition to the post from Minkus above: If you want a full install of the MSDN documentation, just use "ADDLOCAL=ALL". No need to list up every single component. At least it works here :)...

Setup Information:
Setup Type: unspecified
Deployment Method Used: unspecified
Deployment Difficulty: unspecified
Platform(s): Windows
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117
Note

Please Note: When you create your Visual Studio .Net Package and distribute, you may receive 1603 Errors when deploying the package indicating failure although the deployment is successful. This is a known bug and the fix is as follows: You must not use SMSWrapper.exe instead you must obtain another MS Utility called VSUnattend.exe and replace SMSWrapper with it. You will have to re-create your VS.INI file and edit the setup.pdb file with the following values: [productinformation] initialfilecopy=0

Setup Information:
Setup Type: unspecified
Deployment Method Used: unspecified
Deployment Difficulty: unspecified
Platform(s): Windows
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Visual Studio .NET Enterprise Developer

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