Before we dedicate a lot of time to this our team had a few questions about packaging on Windows 7 that we'd like answered first and we were hoping this forum could help.

1. When you create any package on Windows 7 do you need to (or should you always) turn off UAC completely?

2. If you packaged something on a Windows 7 machine with UAC off, when you deploy this package to Windows 7 machines using SCCM you will of course have SCCM run this with the System Account or with an Admin accout. Will it still install?

3. If UAC is turned On on your Windows 7 machines can you still have packages run in the Users Context? If not how do you handle manipulation of user settings (example: If you want to move icons to a custom start menu folder or if you want a custom icon on the desktop)

Any help or hints would be great.
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1. When you create any package on Windows 7 do you need to (or should you always) turn off UAC completely?
When creating packages it doesn't matter if the UAC is on or off. You are simply creating some files.

2. If you packaged something on a Windows 7 machine with UAC off, when you deploy this package to Windows 7 machines using SCCM you will of course have SCCM run this with the System Account or with an Admin accout. Will it still install?
It should install. Please note that the UAC doesn't affect the MSI, only the MSI configuration determines if the installation needs Administrator privileges or not.

3. If UAC is turned On on your Windows 7 machines can you still have packages run in the Users Context?
Yes, you can. Just make sure that:
- ALLUSERS is set to "2"
- MSIINSTALLPERUSER is set to "1"
- your package doesn't install anything in per-machine locations (Program Files, HKLM etc.)
Answered 06/22/2010 by: john.pirvu
Senior Yellow Belt

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You wrote:
Yes, you can. Just make sure that:
- ALLUSERS is set to "2"
- MSIINSTALLPERUSER is set to "1"
- your package doesn't install anything in per-machine locations (Program Files, HKLM etc.)

If you set MSIINSTALLPERUSER=1 is that the same as going into your GPO and setting this to ENABLED: computer configuration | Policies | Admin Templates | Windows Components | Windows Installer | Always Install With Elevated Privligeges ? Or if you set MSIINSTALLPERUSER=1 on the command line will it override this GPO setting?
Answered 06/24/2010 by: mhsl808
Fifth Degree Brown Belt

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No, these are different things. GPO deployment is done either per-machine or per-user. Per-machine installations use the local system account and run with full privileges and per-user installations use only the current user account. If your package is per-user you can use the MSIINSTALLPERUSER property. Otherwise, there shouldn't be any problem.
Answered 06/27/2010 by: john.pirvu
Senior Yellow Belt

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