Hi all, not strictly speaking a packaging question but I'm automating 11g client install now and I want to test some tns entries that I added. I used to use tnsping.exe <SID> to test tnsnames.ora entries. I cannot find that.

Anyone know how this is done in the 11g world?

Muchas Gracias!
OG
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Hi Owen,

Sounds odd, I've not looked at the 11g client but find it hard to believe that it doesn't include the tnsping command.

Until you get to the bottom of it you could use sqlplus.exe tool to prove connectivity. tnsping responses after all only prove that there is a listener, not necessarily that the DB is up and working....

Would be interested to find out what's happened to tnsping though!
Answered 02/10/2010 by: MSIPackager
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From what I've read, this is most likely due to one of two things: either Oracle client is confused about the Oracle home, or the default $ORACLE_SID isn't in TNSNAMES.ORA.
Answered 02/10/2010 by: VBScab
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no Ian, it's a different problem. tnsping.exe doesn't exist in c:\oracle\ora11g or any subfolders. why this would be I dont' know.
tnsping was a quick way for testing database connectivity (which is all I really care about in the client install - it's the DBA's job to make sure the database is up and running)
i'll google some more today, it was late and I just wondered if anyone here encountered this..
thanks!
Answered 02/10/2010 by: aogilmor
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OK I do see references to 11g and tnsping. So....maybe you need to customize with network utils? that seems stupid though. I did the str8 out of the box runtime install, hard to believe they'd leave it out of that; if so, congratulations Oracle, you saved about 50K out of a several hundred MB installation by leaving out a very useful tool. And while I'm at it, Oracle, thank you very little for not standardizing on Windows Installer, and using java even for your windows installations. Freakin' Oracle.
Answered 02/10/2010 by: aogilmor
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OK, go it. It's actually absent. Nice one, Oracle! LOL.

I was told by a client's senior Oracle DBA that they use Java because they're wedded to the "universal" part of the Universal Installer: they can essentially take the same code and run it on any platform. "Hah!" would be my response but there you are...
Answered 02/10/2010 by: VBScab
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