to create an msi is not to difficult, but al the ice errors to fix consumes a lot of time.
now is my question is it really nesacerry to fix all ice errors ?
if the answer is no, what ice errors are importent to fix ?
or tell me some best practices with handling ice errors

thank you all
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You don't have to fix every ICE error, but your package will be more stable if you do. Some are MUST fix, some are SHOULD fix and some simply aren't worth the time to fix. Check out PackageValidator.com, that should point you in the right direction.
Answered 03/10/2005 by: VikingLoki
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Agree with Viking..

I've worked in two different packaging houses. One was more strict than the other, making you fix all ICE errors, but leave warnings.

the other doesnt even realise ICE exists AFAIK!
Answered 03/11/2005 by: dm1
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ORIGINAL: johnny07

to create an msi is not to difficult, but al the ice errors to fix consumes a lot of time.
now is my question is it really nesacerry to fix all ice errors ?
if the answer is no, what ice errors are importent to fix ?
or tell me some best practices with handling ice errors

thank you all


There are some ICE errors that are best left alone (ICE69 being one) as trying to "fix" them will cause more errors.

You should endevour to fix all the "Errors" but Warnings can usually be left without too much problems.

nmi
Answered 03/14/2005 by: nmi
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Personally, I would fix ICE69 errors!
Answered 03/14/2005 by: brenthunter2005
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ORIGINAL: VikingLoki

You don't have to fix every ICE error, but your package will be more stable if you do. Some are MUST fix, some are SHOULD fix and some simply aren't worth the time to fix. Check out PackageValidator.com, that should point you in the right direction.



Is there a definitive list available. e.g. how would I know that a particular ICE error is a must fix

Rgds
Answered 03/14/2005 by: stup9togo
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Roxio know how not to fix them... the Easy CD Creator 6 vendor MSI contains at total 18088 validation errors and warnings!

That has go to be a record.
Answered 03/14/2005 by: MSIPackager
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ORIGINAL: brenthunter2005

Personally, I would fix ICE69 errors!


That's fine, but the packages we create via WinInstall typically have 100's of these. They are only warnings and trying to "fix" them is extremely labour intensive for no actual benefit.

Trying to fix them usually generates other ICE errors, so it's best that they are left alone.

nmi
Answered 03/14/2005 by: nmi
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ORIGINAL: stup9togo


ORIGINAL: VikingLoki

You don't have to fix every ICE error, but your package will be more stable if you do. Some are MUST fix, some are SHOULD fix and some simply aren't worth the time to fix. Check out PackageValidator.com, that should point you in the right direction.


Generally you should try and fix any flagged as "errors". Warnings are just that and can normally be ignored. It's very much an experience thing knowing which ones to fix and not fix.

Is there a definitive list available. e.g. how would I know that a particular ICE error is a must fix

Rgds
Answered 03/14/2005 by: nmi
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Funny ... I think every packager has a different attitude to this question. Personally I prefer to fix all errors and warnings as this tends to produce more robust packages.

This can be influenced by your working environment (One place I worked the management often wanted the package live the same morning they were produced ... Needless to say, we had no time to fix the warnings but could sometimes fix the ICE errors).

I agree with nmi that, aside from personal preferences, experience is the only way to know what to fix and what not to fix.
Answered 03/15/2005 by: Flintstone
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