I have searched this board but so far could not find anything.
Did anyone had a issue when u need different versions of java for different apps on one system?
What is the right approach for this problem?

Thanks.
0 Comments   [ + ] Show Comments

Comments

Please log in to comment

Rating comments in this legacy AppDeploy message board thread won't reorder them,
so that the conversation will remain readable.

Answers

0
Luckily, at clients I've worked for so far, we have managed to get away with always installing the higher version and kludging the HKLM registry entries down to the lower version's. That is, if App A requires 1.5.1_0 and App B requires 1.4.2_10, we install 1.5.1_0 and copy all of the explicit 1.5.1_0 entries to 1.4.2_10 entries. HOWEVER, be sure you install of the wretched JRE registration crap before you do the cloning. And no, DON'T do the registration with the SelfReg table, RegSvr32 or MSIExec /y - use a utility to export the registry data to .REG files and then import the .REGs into your project, making sure your authoring tool correctly uses the data therein to populate the correct tables (Classes, etc).

As ever, YMMV.
Answered 07/24/2007 by: VBScab
Red Belt

Please log in to comment
0
ORIGINAL: ogeccut

I have searched this board but so far could not find anything.
Did anyone had a issue when u need different versions of java for different apps on one system?
What is the right approach for this problem?

Thanks.


One good thing about java (maybe the only thing, LOL [;)] ) is that many versions can co-exist peacefully. they all have their own subdirectories and conflicts are minimized.
Answered 07/24/2007 by: aogilmor
Ninth Degree Black Belt

Please log in to comment
0
ORIGINAL: aogilmor
One good thing about java (maybe the only thing, LOL [;)] ) is that many versions can co-exist peacefully. they all have their own subdirectories and conflicts are minimized.
Que? What happens when JRE reads HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\JavaSoft\Java Runtime Environment\CurrentVersion? That always point to one version only. Of course, there are apps which install their own JRE in their folder tree, just to add to the excitement...
Answered 07/24/2007 by: VBScab
Red Belt

Please log in to comment
0
ORIGINAL: VBScab

ORIGINAL: aogilmor
One good thing about java (maybe the only thing, LOL [;)] ) is that many versions can co-exist peacefully. they all have their own subdirectories and conflicts are minimized.
Que? What happens when JRE reads HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\JavaSoft\Java Runtime Environment\CurrentVersion? That always point to one version only. Of course, there are apps which install their own JRE in their folder tree, just to add to the excitement...



Well I doubt any apps rely on that key. If they do they're crazy [8D]
It's been a while but don't they all install their on values under that key?

I know, it's hard for me to say anything good about Java but I have seen very few problems that resulted from more than 1 version. Agree it's crazy how many vendors have their own version with the app...what're you gonna do eh?
Answered 07/24/2007 by: aogilmor
Ninth Degree Black Belt

Please log in to comment
Answer this question or Comment on this question for clarity