I am having a bit of an issue understanding GUIDs for applications, especially when it has to do with creating scripts to uninstall an application. For this instance, Java.
I am doing all of this through the K1000 Scripting.

My needs are this:

Determine what devices have a  Java version that is higher than supported version of a specific software.
Label those devices to group them all together
Use K1000 Run Now scripting to uninstall the Java version we do not want 

What i am running into:

KACE configuration policy gives a GUID for Java 7 Update 67 as {26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217025FF} for 32bit and {26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F06417067FF} for 64bit.
The problem is, none of the PCs I am running this script on are being responsive because they have different GUIDs for Java 7u67

For example:

PC 1
Java 7u67
Win7 64bit
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217051FF}
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall\

PC2
Java 7u67
Win7 64bit
msiexec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217055FF}
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall\

Am I incorrect to presume that a Java GUID is supposed to be the same, accross the board? If I am incorrect, then I have just found that the K1000 Scripting configuration policy is completely useless to create scripts to uninstall Java (and possibly others) on many machines at once.

Any insight would greatly be appreciated.

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I have discovered that with Java also, it comes down to Jave code not making proper updates to the registry.  This is Sun/Oracles fault not kace's  If you do an update it keeps the old guid and a new install will give the real guid for that version.  Kace is just reading what is the registry.

the key is the numbers after the 2F  832 is 32 bit 864 is 64bit then you see a 1 then after that is the version, so 17055 is 7u55.  I created a batch to get all the old versions we had using this rule and created my own uninstall strings.

this was the bat I ran to remove all old java prior to me installing 7u65

MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216003FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216005FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216007FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216017FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216022FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216023FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216024FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86416024FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216025FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216026FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86416026FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216027FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86416027FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216029FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86416029FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216030FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216031FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86416031FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216032FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86416032FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216033FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216034FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216035FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216037FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86416037FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216038FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86416038FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216039FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216043FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83216045FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217004FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217005FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217006FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217007FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86417007FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217009FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86417009FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217010FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86417010FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217011FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86417011FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217013FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217015FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217017FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86417017FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217021FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86417021FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217025FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86417025FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F83217045FF} /qn
MsiExec.exe /X{26A24AE4-039D-4CA4-87B4-2F86417045FF} /qn
Answered 08/22/2014 by: SMal.tmcc
Red Belt

  • This makes complete sense now. Thank you for the information. All of these PCs that I am dealing with had Java previously, which is why I am seeing a bunch of 7055FFs.

    Again, thanks.
    • if you want to deinstall all java versions, use a small script like that (it has the flaw that all Java versions are deinistalled, so you need to reinstall Java if needed)
      wmic product where "name like 'Java%%'" call uninstall

      Recently had the issue that I had multiple java versions installed on a few of my systems but was not sure why (1.7.40, 1.7.60, 1.7.65 and 1.7.67 where installed at the same time)
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