I have got XP to boot up and work in general, but each system i have has different chipsets, how can i deploy chipsets to these machines, i have 15 different machine types an i need one image, so is there a easy way to install the chipset?


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Its better to do an unattended install of the OS and not use an image if you have so many diffanr kinds of HW. You can use something like RIS or Empirum.
Answered 07/22/2004 by: aktiveradio
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I recommend that you divide your machines up by HAL. Use Sysprep with the -bmsd switch, then I run the drivers necessary after the image has booted. I have done 14 different machines this way.
Answered 07/26/2004 by: kwilley
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Or you could just use RIS and then you wouldn't have to worry about the HAL.
Answered 07/26/2004 by: cdupuis
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I don't agree with the RIS statement. Our we had to have a ACPI image and a Uniprocessor image because the Dell GX260's/270's would not work from a ACPI HAL and the older boxes would not work from a Uniprocessor HAL. With sysprep, it will do all the machines with one image.
Answered 07/26/2004 by: BRoadruck
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We use the same flat file for I386 with RIS for machines ranging from celeron 333 to laptops to P4 desktops and so on, we just use a different answer file pointing to the locations for the drivers. It works perfectly each time and is actually faster to setup a new answer file than a sysprep image.
Answered 07/26/2004 by: cdupuis
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Ok, I retreat. Yes, it will work with one standard flat image perfectly. If you want to build an image with applications and configuration and use Riprep, then you will end up with 2 seperate images (aside from the flat). If you actually have that part working properly, then I would love to know how you do not get the HAL problems we are seeing.
Answered 07/26/2004 by: BRoadruck
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I do not use RIPrep at all. We have deployment packages for every application we have installed, they are applied via Group Policy. When I rebuild a machine it is a default patched Windows 2000 SP4 (but it could be Xp Pro). The the machine account is moved to it's final resting place (OU), when rebooted it installs all of the software GPOs applied to that OU (or inherited) so no need to add applications to image.
Answered 07/26/2004 by: cdupuis
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I agree that RIS is a preferable way to go, but not all of us have networks that support DHCP on all subnets. Beauocracy is a wonderful thing, when it comes to budgets.
Answered 07/26/2004 by: kwilley
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Of course. But the way you use RIPrep now, can't you image a machine via RIS then deliver it to the site, or are they delivered to the site new. If only it were a perfect world, then all would just happen for us, mind you we would all be out of jobs...
Answered 07/26/2004 by: cdupuis
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