I have been having some DLL Conflicts with a package, and found out that in the Environment Variables table, there existed similar entries for the same statements created during a setupcapture.

One is in Upper Case, one is in Mixed Case, would anyone know why this happens, or if it is needed? otherwise I intend on Deleting the Mixed case to move it up in the statement, as I believe it is appending at the end when all is done.

"envvar","*=Path","[~];%CDSROOT%\tools\bin","Environment"
"envvar9","*=PATH","%CDSROOT%\tools\bin;[~]","Environment"
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ORIGINAL: Digitalweezil
I have been having some DLL Conflicts with a package, and found out that in the Environment Variables table, there existed similar entries for the same statements created during a setupcapture.
One is in Upper Case, one is in Mixed Case, would anyone know why this happens, or if it is needed? otherwise I intend on Deleting the Mixed case to move it up in the statement, as I believe it is appending at the end when all is done.
"envvar","*=Path","[~];%CDSROOT%\tools\bin","Environment"
"envvar9","*=PATH","%CDSROOT%\tools\bin;[~]","Environment"


You can definitely get rid of one of these. Environment variables aren't case sensitive.
Answered 01/07/2008 by: aogilmor
Ninth Degree Black Belt

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The [~] just means a blank, so you can leave that out too.In fact, that directive means "put the existing path here." If you leave it out, the exiting path will be REPLACED with your entry!

This is another example of Wise being dumb. I suspect the OP had one entry with the new path at the beginning of the path then decided it ought to go at the end, or some scenario like that. Wise decided that these are two, completely separate "paths" which both need to be added to the, er, PATH. Parsing text has never been a strong point...
Answered 01/08/2008 by: VBScab
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ORIGINAL: VBScab

The [~] just means a blank, so you can leave that out too.In fact, that directive means "put the existing path here." If you leave it out, the exiting path will be REPLACED with your entry!

This is another example of Wise being dumb. I suspect the OP had one entry with the new path at the beginning of the path then decided it ought to go at the end, or some scenario like that. Wise decided that these are two, completely separate "paths" which both need to be added to the, er, PATH. Parsing text has never been a strong point...



Boy, remind me to look in the help file before I respond to another post! Thanks for the correction VB
OG
Answered 01/08/2008 by: aogilmor
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actually , the setup capture grabbed both entries. funny thing is, I decided to leave these alone and just drop the proper DLL that was giving me issues into Windows\System32. thus overriding it anyways. I may get rid of the duplicates now just to clean things up.
Answered 01/08/2008 by: Digitalweezil
Orange Belt

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actually , the setup capture grabbed both entries. funny thing is, I decided to leave these alone and just drop the proper DLL that was giving me issues into Windows\System32. thus overriding it anyways. I may get rid of the duplicates now just to clean things up.Good man! It always makes me chuckle that, in 2008, we still have apps which require the use of PATH. It's just lazy programming.
Answered 01/09/2008 by: VBScab
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