Hi All, quick question. I'm trying to add one more level of automation for the driver installations. Right now I need to add the path to the registry or name each driver folder appropriately (audio, network etc) and dig around to make things work. In the past I've used a freebie called sysprep driver scanner to do this for me (it's sweet: http://www.vernalex.com/tools/spdrvscn/).

The problem I am facing is when the program runs. it scans the KACE directory and updates the registry in the PE environment with all the needed driver info so windows will know where to look... This does not do much once I reboot obviously and I don’t see a way to have it write to an alternate registry.

Is it possible to export the updated PE HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\Configuration\ Device path key then import it into the registry on the newly imaged machine? If so running this after imaging but before rebooting would make drivers a breeze…

Also, I'm using the native imaging.

Thanks for any input!
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There are a few ways to do this, but both involved loading a registry. In KBE, you can load the registry from you os drive to inject your path. You could also download the current registry from your image, load it temporarily on your system, make the necessary changes, unload it, then replace it back in your image, commiting the changes.
If this is for xp I'll have new tasks that does this for you automatically.
Answered 03/19/2012 by: cserrins
Red Belt

  • Thanks Corey. I think the first will be best, I'll play with that. If it works I'll be able to automatically update the path windows looks to for drivers on my XP images, this way I don't have to spend time messing with folder names / driver locations. It would just work as long as I extract the drivers to C:\KACE\drivers_postinstall\whereever...
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