looking for a way to disable secondary monitors using the k1000 or group policy. or as a lesser alternative a way to tell who is using multiple screens without logging into every single computer. running into folks keeping old or bringing in from home secondary screens, then call i.t. when one of them goes bad. thus when we call in for waranty at a remote location we get hit with a bill because our records indicate only 1 monitor that should have been warantied.
Answer Summary:
What you can do is take away access to the display properties. Remember these settings are per user so you'll need something to deploy to that level. I like active setup for tasks like this. http://www.astahost.com/info/tploc-disable-display-properties-tabs.html
Cancel
0 Comments   [ + ] Show Comments

Comments

Please log in to comment

Community Chosen Answer

2
What you can do is take away access to the display properties. Remember these settings are per user so you'll need something to deploy to that level. I like active setup for tasks like this.
http://www.astahost.com/info/tploc-disable-display-properties-tabs.html
Answered 04/03/2012 by: dchristian
Red Belt

Please log in to comment

Answers

0
Not sure if this helps or even possible but you can implement a asset tag system so when someone calls IT for an issue, if there is no asset tag on the device it would be a non-supported item.
Answered 04/04/2012 by: nshah
Red Belt

Please log in to comment
0

there's one question here: how are these getting set up?  You'll need some way to do a dual-output.  Do you have dual output or second video cards as standard?  Or are people bringing in their own video cards as well?

More than a technical problem, what you have here is a policy/process problem.  Keeping old monitors should be handled as part of the hardware refresh: you have one monitor, you get one monitor.  No, you can't keep it.  Have your boss buy one if you need a second one.  Even better than a second monitor is a large monitor.  It's easier to use and easier to read.

Then, decide on a standard monitor.  Managing and tracking monitors, which really are disposable, is a pain.  If the department in question gets billed for hardware, them the solution is pretty simple: they pay for this.  Make a manager pay for an employee's personal hardware once or twice, and the problem will come to a screeching halt.  And if that managerwants to blow their budget on personal hardware, that's their problem.  Non-standard monitor?  Sorry, no service on non-standard equipment.  Then you handle the policy/standard problem with policy/standards, and not trying to make technology handle a non-technical problem.

Answered 04/18/2012 by: Arminius
Second Degree Green Belt

Please log in to comment
Answer this question or Comment on this question for clarity