Hi Everyone,
I wonder if I can ask some advice?

I am currently working on a package within sccm to install Visual Studio 2010 to Windows 7.0. My package works correctly, configured with a .cmd to run appropriate msi's etc.

However, I am also attempting to run an upgrade after the install from SQL 2008 to SQL 2008 R2. I have setup an sccmwrapper to run both cmd install scripts one after the other which tests successfully from SYSTEM command line while logged on.

When I import this setup in sccm and set the package to run only 'when no user is logged' [the install takes forever :)] the install succeeds but throws multiple errors when opening Visual Studio.

I think the errors are occurring because there is no restart between the installs and because it is running when logged off therefore the program items and settings etc are not being initialized in between installs. When it is run from SYSTEM command line while logged on I have no problems.

So...My question is:

What is the most efficient and foolproof manner for configuring an sccm software package to run from sccmwrapper then restart and run a second install? Logged on or logged off? I have looked into task sequencing but this is not an enterprise wide application install at OSD [Only the Devs require Visual Studio].

I currently have an sccm software package with two 'programs' [running the cmd scripts respectively] configured with a 'configmgr' restart at the end of each, what I am wondering is will the second install be recognized after a restart? Or will it simply be ignored? Or should I forget about running this 'when no user is logged on'?

Please let me know if this is unclear.

Cheers [:)]
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I have looked into task sequencing but this is not an enterprise wide application install at OSD

Just because your installation is not part of an OSD, this does not exclude the use of task sequences. You can advertise a task sequence just like you can advertise any other program. One thing to take into account is the fact that the seperate programs you run in a task sequence cannot allow user interaction, or they will not be selectable for a task sequence.

PJ
Answered 06/03/2011 by: pjgeutjens
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pjgeutjens, thanks for that...I had the false impression that a task sequence was reliant on a 'boot image' for an OSD deployment.

I will give it a shot 'cos I think it is the best approach to my requirement.

Cheers [:)]
Answered 06/05/2011 by: rich0864
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Please be aware that there is a dedicated 'SCCM/SMS' forum here on AppDeploy :-)
Answered 06/06/2011 by: VBScab
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So, in the interest of sharing knowledge and not 're-inventing' the wheel...

I decided, in the end, not to go with the task sequencing option, not because of difficulty rather because I decided on not having a restart between installs.

The issue here was that Visual Studio installs SQL 2008 express by default which I didn't want as the devs required SQL 2008 R2 (for management console and other features) and an upgrade from SQL Express to SQL Server will not include all features.

What I ended up with was:

1. Configured an install for SQL 2008 R2 and unticked 'Business Integration' module in order to avoid Visual Studio 2008 being installed and then saved the resulting '.ini' file to my app source.
2. Archived the SQL folder into and winrar sfx exe wrapper which calls the setup.exe and passes the appropriate config params to it specifying the '.ini' (see M$ docs for SQL cmd line params).
3. Configured an install for Visual Studio 2010 excluding the SQL 2008 Express install and again saved the resulting '.ini' file to my app source.
4. Again archived the app source folder into a winrar sfx exe (note: not using wise or installshield on this site) with appropriate config params to it specifying the '.ini' (again, see M$ docs for VS 2010 cmd line params, Google is our friend...)
5. Created cmd script that calls each exe in order
6. I have not tested passed this stage at present but adding this to SCCM and running the cmd script as the program under packages for deployment.

It is something of a hack job I suppose but it achieves the desired results.

Happy to hear if anyone has come up with something more elegant, it is all about learning after all :-)

Cheers, thanks for the advice...

PS: I will be sure to post in the appropriate forums from now on :)
Answered 06/07/2011 by: rich0864
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ORIGINAL: rich0864

pjgeutjens, thanks for that...I had the false impression that a task sequence was reliant on a 'boot image' for an OSD deployment.

I will give it a shot 'cos I think it is the best approach to my requirement.

Cheers [:)]


I was under that impression as well. Perhaps if they didn't put Task Sequences under the OS Deployment branch in the SCCM console then people wouldn't think that it could only be used in OS deployments :)
Answered 06/12/2011 by: chris128
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Agreed, that element of SCCM is not very well documented as an 'application' option.
Answered 06/12/2011 by: rich0864
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