Hi All,

I have done some modification in the cmd line of the program (office 2007) which i am deploying through SCCM. I want to know that How long it takes to get the new cmd refreshed to all the clients/DPs etc?

I am not very sure that it is getting refreshed.

Thanks,
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I'd say, wait 10 minutes and don't forget to initiate a user policy refresh from the Configuration Manager.

You "should" have the new command line by then. However, with some bad luck you won't have it..... That's just typically SCCM.


If you're still doubting it's executing the right command there's only one way to check (as far as I know):

Either create a duplicate program, exact the same settings except for the program name, or delete your program and create it again.

Then, when running on the client, you either see the new program name in the advertisement or you can look up the program ID number that it used in the logging, as a new program has a new ID.

That's the only way to be 100% sure it used the right command line.
Answered 05/03/2010 by: Rheuvel
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Thanks Rheuvel

So that means i need to create a new program every time when i have to edit/modify something.

Do i need to create a new advertisement also each time?

Do i need to distribute as well?


I am new user of sccm so i am unaware. Your help is highly appreciated.

Thanks
Answered 05/05/2010 by: dnmech
Senior Purple Belt

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Durgesh,

Before you make the change to your program (under Software Distribution>Packages) check the 'Package Status' for the package.
It will show you the 'Source Version' and which DPs it is set up for, along with a 'Last Copied' date.

When you make the change to your program's command line and 'Update Distribution Points' check back with the 'Package Status'.
You should see the 'Source Version' increment and when the 'Targeted' and 'Installed' columns tally (you will need to refresh the view), you know that the change has hit all of your DPs and the 'Last Copied' date will show when that completed.

If you're new to SCCM administration and there isn't a training course coming your way in the near future, then it would be worthwhile investing in a copy of 'Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager 2007' from Microsoft Press, written by Steven D. Kaczmarek with the Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager Team. - ISBN-13 978-0-7356-2385-9.

It's not a self study guide (there isn't one for SCCM), but a reference book and it's invaluable for working out this kind of question and many others.

Hope this helps,

Dunnpy
Answered 05/05/2010 by: dunnpy
Red Belt

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Thanks Paul,

Your reply cleared my doubts to a large extent (won't say fully cleared) :P. I will sure try to get my hands on the book which you have suggested.


Cheers!
Answered 05/05/2010 by: dnmech
Senior Purple Belt

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Forget what I said and go with dunnpy's method if that works for you. That's probably the way it's meant to be done. At least, it sounds like a better solution. If it works...

In my experience sometimes even when the distribution points are updated according to logs, the client will still install the old source (and I refreshed the user policies as well after the distribution points were updated).

The problem is, I visit different customers and sometimes SCCM works just fine and FAST, while others are REALLY SLOW and nothing seems to work as its supposed to. It could be that some just made a mess out of SCCM, but let's just say if you have bad luck, you need some more radical measures (like deleting anything to be sure you get the right stuff).

And I have to add, in the slow environments the changes will eventually get to the client, but it sometimes takes a day or longer before every client has them, and I don't have that time, so I'm speeding things up (because somehow new programs/advertisements get to the clients faster than updates in my experience?!)
Answered 05/06/2010 by: Rheuvel
Brown Belt

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If you make changes to a package program you wont need to 'update the distribution points'. You only need to update the distribution points when you make direct changes the package source.

All you need to do is make the change to the program, then check the status message query (Programs created, Modified, or Deleted) within admin console. This will confirm SCCM has detected the change.

To find out if the clients have received the change (therefore the policy has updated) go to the execmgr.log on the local machine. The machine must be in the collection that the package/advertisement is pointing to. To force the policy update, you need to update the machine policy (machine policy evaluation and update cycle). THe execmgr.log should show you something similar to this once it has been updated: Policy is updated for Program: Per-system unattended, Package: Package Name


Once you see this you can re-run the advertisement on the client and it will run your updated program.




Answered 05/11/2010 by: Killragtshirts
Orange Belt

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