Our current method of disabling javascript globally in the Adobe reader is no longer going to work for us now that we are implementing a software package that requires the plugins that allow JS functionality in Adobe reader. I am looking to pursue the path again of attempting to prevent users from enabling JS from the preferences menu. Previously the option was not even available in preferences with our previous distro.

I believe this can be done by only allowing read permissions on HKCU\Software\Adobe\Acrobat Reader\9.0\JSPrefs key. In order for this to work this key cannot inherit permissions from the parent and the only permission allowed is read. The read permission has to be granted or Acrocrap defaults to JS enabled if it cannot read this key.

Can this be done using self healing and the LockRegPermissions table? If so does anyone know what the permission value would be in the LockRegPermissions table? Or if someone has figured out another way to accomplish disabling JS in Acrobrat that I have overlooked please let me know.

I am not concerned with users going into the registry to set the correct permissions on this key to enable JS.
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Could someone help me with lifting my jaw from the floor, please?

Adobe just gets better and better with their absurd behaviour. What sort of brain-dead developer would decide that anything in HKCU should be read only!?! Priceless...
Answered 04/19/2010 by: VBScab
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VBScab I think you misread what I posted. Other than the fact that we are dealing with Adobe Acrocrap products. [:@] My issue is that I wish to make the JSPrefs registry key read only for the user to prevent them from going into the preferences menu and enabling JS. In my testing, by setting the key to read only rights they cannot enable JS and make it stick as they otherwise would. I'm just wanting to know if you can use the LockRegPermissions table and self healing to accomplish this?
Answered 04/19/2010 by: joedown
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I guess so but that table is a custom one, not a regular Windows Installer one. The format looks similar (making one wonder why they bothered...) but the definitive answer would need to come from Adobe. I expect it's exhaustively documented somewhere on the Adobe site, right? [sound of barely-concealed guffaws in the background]

As for self-healing, is that table read by a Custom Action? If so, I guess you could alter any condition on its execution such that it would run in that scenario.
Answered 04/20/2010 by: VBScab
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Oh, my bad. I'm still learning this stuff and I didn't even realize that this wasn't a standard table. Of course why should I be surprised that Adobe would add a custom table? [:'(] So LockPermissions table is the one that I should be using. And yes, you are correct Ian this custom table is called in a custom action along with their LockFilePermissions table. What a cluster.

Surprisingly I found this article on Adobe's website: http://kb2.adobe.com/cps/509/cpsid_50909.html Explains a little how their table works.
Answered 04/20/2010 by: joedown
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Can the LockPermissions table be used to set permissions in HKCU? If so, would this have to be done using self healing in order to set the correct permissions for each user that logs in?
Answered 05/06/2010 by: joedown
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Yes and yes. :)
Answered 05/06/2010 by: VBScab
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Ok, that seems doable now how does one insure that the self healing happens? Most user do not actually launch the application from a shortcut but rather they just double click on a PDF document or open one from the web thereby bypassing the shortcut entry point? Does this mean Active Setup in conjunction with self healing or something else?
Answered 05/06/2010 by: joedown
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Most user do not actually launch the application from a shortcut but rather they just double click on a PDF document ...

One option you have, Joe, besides active setup, is to advertise the .PDF file extension using the Extension table in your MSI (and ProgID and MIME, which it references). Since we're talking Adobe Reader here, and I seem to remember the .PDF extension actually NOT being advertised by Adobe's MSI (others are - use these for inspiration), you could try adding this extension advertisement, linking it to a component and its matching feature, and then in that same feature adding a component to do your user specific actions (which in this case means a Dummy Component I believe, just to trigger the repair, so the LockPermissions table can be processed)

One thing I should mention is that I've never done this myself yet, so let me know how it works out [;)]

EDIT: had a quick look at the vendor MSI for Reader 9.1.1, and the .pdf extension is put directly in the registry by the MSI, so no advertisement. You might need to remove these keys from the registry table when you replace em with the advertisement.
EDIT2: to be complete, you can ofcourse cop out and combine Active Setup and an msiexec.exe /f, but we're striving for something higher here, right? [8|]

PJ
Answered 05/06/2010 by: pjgeutjens
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