Speakers: Andy Malone, Frank Simorjay, Marcus Murray, Mark Simos, Paula Januszkiewicz

BYOD is a challenge, always. "Bring your own data to any device". But it is the future that must be accepted. It shouldn't be stopped, we need to adjust security measures to properly meet the challenges. Risk Management in different areas of risk.

One big misconception about smartphones: inherently insecure. Sanboxing is actually stronger on an iPhone than a PC due to access to the system's kernel.

Best way to deal with mobile malware: Don't jailbreak your phone (there was quite a bit of disagreement on this). There is no magic bullet. MDM and antivirus marketing doesn't always reflect reality.
Jailbroken devices solution? Ipsec stopping communication between computer clients and backend. Be proactive. What does your company want the BYOD to actually do?

Don't use old devices! Extreme security vulnerability.

Antivirus on mobile platforms aren't new. Internet facing printers are just as a high of threat as BYOD.

Microsoft Blue will offer many solutions to BYOD challenges.


Discovering Malware on the Network
To bo honest, it's so easy to circumvent every antivirus software out there today. You have to be proactive. Whitelisting may be a possible solution. Watch services and drivers, memory, unsigned DLLs.
Do you care if there is malware? You'll never be 100% clean with a larger environment. Look at the infected host, look at what type of malware. Botnet on admin assistant computer not as a big of a threat as high level engineer. Maybe this shouldn't be acceptable…Segmenting and containing the network is always a good idea.

Attacks are changing (stuxnet, dupaflame, etc). For example, stuxnet had a huge impact. Very large scale and professional. It's still very easy to break into most enterprises. No longer just "script kiddies" but rather professionally employed by corps and governments to perform cyber attacks.

Authentication Mechanism Insurance for smart card authentication via a template to allow AD group membership